Enough

This story, set during the Famine of the 1930s, tells of a young girl’s attempts to save her village from starvation. Marusia’s ingenuity gives her the opportunity to go on a magical journey to the North American Prairies to find more food for her village. Generosity triumphs over greed in this spirited Ukrainian folktale.

Reviews:

U of Alberta wrote:

“Dosyt (Enough – translated) ; A heart warming tale”,
— University of Alberta

“a fascinating story”, “an excellent storytime selection”, “a magnificent retelling”, “Enough is a captivating story”;

Valerie Nielsen on CM wrote:

“Young listeners will warm to the courageous protagonist and derive immense satisfaction from the outcome of her clever ruse to deceive the Dictator.”

Globe & Mail wrote:

“Michael Martchenko’s illustrations play nicely into this picture book set in a village in Ukraine as the Soviets come into power.”

National Post wrote:

““Canadian writer Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch has stayed with the classic folk tale formula of a greedy landlord and his men who steal the harvest. This particular landlord is Josef Stalin”

” Michael Martchenko’s spirited illustrations full of specific detail right from the Ukrainian shawl lining the end-papers, give the story the weight of truth”

Sheree Van Vreede on Children’s Literature wrote:

How much is “enough?” For many of us, it is difficult to answer that question while we live in our comfortable homes with plenty of food to eat. For Marusia and her father, “enough” is simply a few seeds of grain. Set during the famine in the Ukraine during the 1930s, this wonderful book depicts the hardship faced by one small village because of the greed of the Dictator and his officers, who think they never have “enough.” The life-like illustrations help tell this story of hope and perseverance, as Marusia and her fellow villagers work to outsmart the Dictator. This is a wonderful contemporary folktale and would be a great addition to any library.

 

Author: Marsha

I write historical fiction, mostly from the perspective of young people who are thrust in the midst of war.